chicagoprostatefoundation.org

PCFC spotlighted by West Suburban Philanthropic Network

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago is proud to participate in West Suburban Philanthropic Network, along with other area nonprofits that work to benefit our shared community.  Read our Spotlight Feature, published in the WSPN Summer 2016 Newsletter.

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago

In his mid-fifties, Eddie shared that “I felt so hopeless and helpless when I found out I had prostate cancer.  I didn’t know what to do, and was very nervous.”  He decided to explore a support group for men and families facing prostate cancer and its many treatment options.  “It really helped having a hands-on physician, available to help answer my questions.  It gives you piece of mind knowing there are different methods of treatment for prostate cancer, and that other men have many of the same concerns.”

Ten years later, Eddie still benefits from a welcoming Patient Support Group, hosted by Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago (PCFC).  Since the Westmont nonprofit was established in 2006, PCFC has hosted over 100 monthly support group meetings as one way to fulfill its mission to promote public awareness, cancer prevention, detection and treatment options to prostate cancer patients and families, and medical professionals involved in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.

According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 250,000 men in the U.S. are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year.  Second to skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men, affecting one in seven over their lifespan.  Over the last 20 years, the U.S. has seen a six-fold increase in younger men in the prime of life receiving a diagnosis of aggressive, life-threatening prostate cancer, making early detection even more important for many men.

Prostate cancer is highly treatable, especially when detected at an early stage.  To promote prostate cancer detection, PCFC offers a Prostate Cancer Screening Event each September during national Prostate Cancer Awareness Month.  Free services include a PSA blood test and digital rectal examination for prostate abnormalities with consultation by a physician.

Since initiating the annual event in 2009, PCFC has screened over 450 men, averaging age 63.   The event often bridges the prostate screening needs of underserved men.  Despite current policy debates on whether and when to check for prostate cancer, PCFC advocates screening for all men beginning in their fifties.  Men with a family history of prostate cancer and African American men, for whom prostate cancer tends to be more aggressive, are advised to consider prostate screening starting at age 40 or younger.

Foundation outreach also advances awareness of prostate cancer through employer and corporate wellness programs and community, church, and other organization meetings.  Educational presentations by PCFC director of research and education are tailored to each audience, and can range from general health and cancer awareness to prostate health and prostate cancer.

PCFC works hand-in-hand with Chicago Prostate Cancer Center (CPCC), also of Westmont, which is the only freestanding, full-service medical facility in the world solely dedicated to minimally invasive prostate cancer treatments.  The Center has served over 20,000 men from across the nation.

Together, they conduct clinical research and have trained hundreds of physicians to continually advance best practices in brachytherapy (also known as seed implant), a convenient, effective option for many men seeking to remain productive during prostate cancer treatment.  PCFC has participated in publishing and presenting results for over 35 clinical studies, contributing to prostate cancer treatment advancements for area men and men worldwide.

Among their transformative research studies, PCFC helped pioneer a biopsy mapping technique allowing more precise tumor location and targeting; examined genomic testing to gauge tumor aggressiveness; studied the interaction of diabetes with prostate cancer; and demonstrated patients treated with seed implants have excellent long-term survival rates.

PCFC’s current studies include those designed to: 1) further refine seed implant techniques and better monitor patients with slow growing tumors contained within the prostate; 2) investigate options for men with locally advanced cancer outside the prostate; and 3) analyze outcomes in patients younger than 62— men more likely to have fast-growing prostate cancer and who stand the best chance of survival with early detection.

To learn more, please visit www.chicagoprostatefoundation.org.

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Power of Genomic Testing

Prostate cancer tumor growth rates vary

While men of the same age may have similar PSA (prostate specific antigen blood test results), Gleason score (grading of tumor cell irregularities), and T category (spread of the tumor), they may actually have prostate cancer tumor growth rates that vary widely.  By knowing how aggressively tumor cells are replicating,  physicians may be able to better personalize prostate cancer treatment.

Who benefits from genomic testing?

National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines for Prostate Cancer address staging and risk assessment after an initial diagnosis of prostate cancer, as well as man­agement options for localized, regional, and metastatic disease.  NCCN is currently discussing newly available tests of genes identified in prostate cell function.  Prolaris and Oncotype DX are two molecular assays that NCCN deems may answer the need for a biomarker to predict disease progression.   Genomic testing is typically limited to patients with early-stage prostate cancer contained within the prostate, and is not currently required as the standard of care.  Cost of genomic testing is covered by some insurance plans and can typically be performed with biopsy tissue already submitted for routine pathology.

More information

The predictive power of genomic testing promises to help many men more confidently weigh their prostate cancer treatment options, aligning with the mission of the non-profit organization Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago to provide education, support and research on prostate cancer treatment.  For further patient information visit Chicago Prostate Cancer Center;  NCCN also provides a patient guide to prostate cancer.

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The Prostate Gland

1. It keeps sperm healthy

Located just below the bladder, the prostate is a walnut-sized gland found only in men. The urethra, the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the penis, runs through it. Its main role is to produce prostatic fluid to provide nutrients for sperm.

2. STIs can cause prostate infection

Prostatitis, inflammation or infection of the prostate, mainly affects men under 40 and can develop from a urinary tract infection. Symptoms can include pain when urinating and ejaculating and pelvic pain. The cause can be anything from bacteria to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as gonorrhoea or chlamydia. It can be treated with antibiotics.

3. Prostatitis may link to cancer

Evidence suggests men who have had prostatitis may be more at risk of developing prostate cancer. The inflammation, especially combined with a lack of vitamin D, may encourage the cancer to develop.

4. Vitamin D is good for prostate health

Good genital hygiene and condoms can help prevent urinary tract infections and prostatitis. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D promotes resistance to infections.

5. The prostate can enlarge with age

At least 60 per cent of men over 60 have benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or an enlarged prostate. Symptoms include difficulty urinating and needing the toilet often. If symptoms are mild, no treatment is needed, but in severe cases, medication to shrink the gland or surgery can improve quality of life.

6. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men

One in nine men develops prostate cancer, about 20,000 are diagnosed annually in Australia and 3300 die from it. Almost two-thirds of those diagnosed are older than 65. Men of Afro-Caribbean descent have an increased risk, as do those who have a close relative with the disease. Having an STI at a young age can also be a risk factor. According to the American Cancer Society, about 238,590 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed in 2013, and about 29,720 will die from it.

7. Genes can play a part in prostate cancer

Up to 10 per cent of prostate cancer cases have an inherited component. For example, the BRCA2 gene, which can cause breast cancer in women, is also associated with prostate cancer.

8. Prostate cancer can be symptomless

Although some men have lower back or hip pain, prostate cancer may have few or no signs in the early stages. A PSA blood test checks whether levels of prostate-specific antigen, a chemical made by the gland, are raised, which may indicate cancer. In advanced prostate cancer the sufferer may experience bone, pelvic or back pain, weight loss and blood in the urine or semen.

9. Diagnosis of prostate cancer is improving

A new test, PCA3, measures a protein only produced by cancer cells and is about 80 per cent accurate. A definite diagnosis can be made with a biopsy.

10. Prostate cancer is often slow-growing

The challenge is to find out whether the cancer is aggressive or slow-growing as treatment can cause serious side effects, including incontinence and impotence. Most cancers are slow-growing. Post mortems show that 80 per cent of men aged 80 have cancer cells in the prostate that may have been present for 20 to 25 years and they have died of other causes.

11. Treatment for prostate cancer varies

Doctors decide on treatment based on a man’s age, how aggressive the cancer appears, PSA test results and the man’s attitude. Out of every 100 men diagnosed, about two-thirds have aggressive treatment. The other third opt for monitoring through regular blood tests, biopsies and digital rectal examinations.

12. There are often no side effects from prostate cancer treatment

Treatment can include removing the prostate, radiotherapy, freezing or heat treatment to destroy the gland. There is little difference in survival rates between treatments, although freezing and heating are quite new. Due to better techniques, serious side effects from treatment are less common.

13. Tomatoes are good for the prostate

Several studies show that men who eat foods containing lycopene, found in tomatoes and tomato-based foods, have a lower risk of developing prostate cancer. Getting enough exercise also appears to reduce the risk. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables, maintain a healthy weight and don’t smoke.

Information provided by body+soul. http://www.bodyandsoul.com.au/health+healing/mens+health/13+important+facts+about+prostate+health,6971

American Cancer Society

http://www.cancer.org/

 

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Prostate Cancer’s Impact on Couples: How to deal with both the physical and emotional effects

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago comments on excerpt from Yes You Can: Dr. Barb’s Recipe for Lifelong Intimacy, posted January 19, 2016 by Barb DePree, M.D 

www.nextavenue.org/prostate-cancers-impact-on-couples/

Dr. Barb DePree shares that “prostate cancer is often called the ‘couples disease’ because of its broad-reaching effects in the bedroom – and elsewhere.”  Apart from worry about the cancer itself, potential side effects from surgery or other prostate cancer treatments can affect a man’s sexual function and emotional wellbeing.  DePree recommends education, exploration and experimentation as steps for couples needing a new beginning to sex after prostate cancer.

However, initial communication is essential for understanding the stress that prostate cancer may cause both patient and partner.  By learning together about prostate cancer and discovering ways to maintain sexual intimacy, couples can keep an emotional connection and help a man maintain his sense of masculinity despite physical changes.   Dr. DePree acknowledges the challenges faced by spouses adjusting to not only her partner’s health but also her own age-related health changes and family demands.

At Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago (PCFC), we invite spouses, partners and caregivers to benefit from our Patient Support Group.  The opportunity for both partners to learn firsthand about prostate cancer treatment options and research can help couples cope with the seeming deluge of information after a prostate cancer diagnosis while gaining insight from other patients and couples.  Visit www.chicagoprostatefoundation.org for Patient Support Group details & schedule, and to learn other ways the non-profit PCFC educates patients and the public on prostate cancer.

Also, PCFC works hand-in-hand with Chicago Prostate Cancer Center (CPCC) on research to advance best practices in brachytherapy, the least disruptive option for many men seeking to remain productive during prostate cancer treatment.  Multiple research institutions, comparing prostate cancer treatments, demonstrate outcomes with single-day seed implant therapy are consistent with equal-to-better cancer eradication and fewer urinary, bowel, and erectile side effects common to external beam radiation—requiring as many as 9 weeks of daily outpatient sessions, or with prostatectomy—-a major surgery necessitating inpatient hospitalization and typical 3-6 week recovery.  More information on CPCC is available at www.prostateimplant.com

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The Grainger Foundation Supports Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago

Market Manager Joe Schneider and Team Leader Jason Astudillo share The Grainger Foundation’s generous grant with Michelle Braccioforte, Director of Research and Education, Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, and Jennifer McCartney, Administrative Director, Chicago Prostate Cancer Center.

Market Manager Joe Schneider and Team Leader Jason Astudillo share The Grainger Foundation’s generous grant with Michelle Braccioforte, Director of Research and Education, Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago and Jennifer McCartney, Administrative Director, Chicago Prostate Cancer Center.

 

Westmont, IL, December 2, 2015 – The Grainger Foundation, an independent, private foundation located in Lake Forest, Illinois, has donated $10,000 to the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago.  This grant will go toward the support of programs that promote awareness, prevention, detection, and treatment options for patients, their families and medical professionals, and information for newly diagnosed patients to help make informed treatment decisions.

“These funds will be used to educate men about prostate cancer through the various PCFC programs, including our Patient Support Group, Community and Workplace Wellness Presentations, and free prostate cancer screening events, said Michelle Braccioforte, Director of Research and Education, Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago.  “Each year, approximately 250,000 men nationwide are diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to the American Cancer Society.  In fact, during the last 20 years, the U.S. has seen a six-fold increase in men under the age of 60 receiving a diagnosis of aggressive, life-threatening prostate cancer.  We are grateful to The Grainger Foundation for its generosity.”

This donation was recommended by Joe Schneider, Market Manager of W.W. Grainger, Inc.’s, Downers Grove location.  Grainger has been a part of the Downers Grove business community for more than 27 years as the leading broad line supplier of maintenance, repair, and operating products.  “We are proud to recommend the programs offered by the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago,” said Schneider.  “We understand the need for greater awareness and detection of prostate cancer by men of all ages.”

The Grainger Foundation, an independent, private foundation based in Lake Forest, Illinois, was established in 1949 by William W. Grainger, founder of W.W. Grainger, Inc.

The Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving quality of care and quality of life by funding patient support programs, clinical research, as well as professional and public education.  Its goal is to further promote public awareness, cancer prevention, detection, and treatment options to prostate cancer patients, their families, and medical professionals involved in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.  This philanthropic organization works hand-in-hand with the Chicago Prostate Cancer Center, which is the only freestanding, full-service medical facility in the world that is solely dedicated to minimally invasive prostate cancer treatments.

For further information about Grainger contact: Joe Micucci, Director of Media Relations at Joseph.Micucci@grainger.com

For further information about Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago contact: Jennifer McCartney, Administrative Director at jennifer@prostateimplant.com

 

 

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Prostate Cancer Support Groups

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, who recently announced his prostate cancer diagnosis, was invited to attend a local Scranton prostate cancer support group.  Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago (PCFC) commends Governor Wolf for drawing attention to prostate cancer and the need for screening.

PCFC would like to extend a similar invitation to all area men diagnosed with prostate cancer, their spouses, and caregivers who seek additional information about treatment options, or anyone interested in prostate cancer, to attend a meeting of PCFC Prostate Cancer Support Group.

We would also like to welcome individuals who may have attended the nearby prostate cancer support group chapter of US Too, International, which recently discontinued meeting at its Lombard location.  All are welcome to benefit from discussions, sharing, and learning at PCFC Prostate Cancer Support Group meetings, held the first Wednesday of each month.

Why attend a support group meeting? A recent Canadian study of the value of prostate cancer support groups demonstrated preliminary data when primary care physicians were positive about patient support groups, their referred patients, in turn, had positive experiences.  Previous research on support groups cited reassurance, reduced anxiety, improved positive outlook and the perception of being more involved in treatment decisions. The recent study found face-to-face support group attendance could begin with participation in web-based patient support forums, which may also be especially useful in rural areas.

But as one advocate of traditional support groups—a participant in Scranton’s Man to Man prostate cancer support group—stated “Every time you walk away, you’re going to learn something, you’re going to share something with somebody, and if you can help one person, that’s I think the best thing that we can do.”  Many of PCFC’s long-time Patient Support Group members echo this outlook, and share they would not miss a meeting for the chance to give back to other men facing prostate cancer.

For more information visit Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago, or contact Michelle Braccioforte, MPH, Director of Education and Research at 630-654-2515.  PCFC is also available to provide prostate cancer wellness educational presentations for your employee wellness program or at meetings of your community, church, or other organization.

 

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Genomic Testing

National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Guidelines for Prostate Cancer address staging and risk assessment after an initial diagnosis of prostate cancer, and man­agement options for localized, regional, and metastatic disease.

While men of the same age may have similar PSA (prostate specific antigen blood test results), Gleason score (grading of tumor cell irregularities), and T category (spread of the tumor), they may actually have prostate cancer tumor growth rates that vary widely.  By knowing how aggressively tumor cells are replicating,  physicians may be able to better personalize prostate cancer treatment.

NCCN is currently discussing newly available tests of genes identified in prostate cell function.  Prolaris and Oncotype DX are two molecular assays that NCCN deems may answer the need for a biomarker to predict disease progression.   Genomic testing is typically limited to patients with early-stage prostate cancer contained within the prostate.

The predictive power of genomic testing promises to help many men more confidently weigh their prostate cancer treatment options, aligning with the mission of the non-profit organization Prostate Cancer Foundation of Chicago which provides education, support and research on prostate cancer treatment.  For further patient information visit Chicago Prostate Cancer Center.  NCCN also provides a patient guide to prostate cancer.

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Men’s Health Supplements Useless in Prostate Cancer Patients

While a daily multi-vitamin may be advisable to fill in some general  nutrition gaps, there is currently no proof any of the supplements studied here improve prostate cancer health.

Pam Harrison

October 20, 2015

SAN ANTONIO ― Patients with prostate cancer who take any kind of men’s health supplement purporting to improve prostate health derive absolutely no benefit from supplementation, either in terms of improving their prognosis or reducing their risk for toxicity from radiation therapy, new research shows.

The study was presented here at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 57th Annual Meeting.

“We’ve routinely told patients not to take any medication unless they have a diagnosis and they have a particular reason to take a drug,” Nicholas Zaorsky, MD, resident physician in radiation oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, told Medscape Medical News.

“And to our knowledge, there is no diagnosis that would have been a reason for men to take these supplements, but now we have a study to back us up on this.”

The study was done as a retrospective analysis and included patients treated at a National Cancer Institute–designated comprehensive cancer center.

From 2001 to 2012, 2207 men were treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer.

Men received a median dose of 78 Gy; the median follow-up was 46 months.

Using a very strict definition for men’s health supplements, only about 10% of the cohort were taking supplements marketed specifically for men’s health in general or prostate health in particular, but in the cohort overall, approximately half of all the patients were taking at least some sort of supplement.

Men’s health supplements contained a median of three identifiable ingredients, the most common being saw palmetto.

However, as Dr Zaorsky noted, there is no law saying that whatever is contained in a supplement must be shown on the label, and many of the ingredients listed on the label were simply “other,” “trade secret enzyme,” or “prostate complex.”

“None of the drug companies we know about have actually published a study in which these men’s health supplements were used, so we wanted to see, first of all, do these drug help men with the cancer they are most likely to get, which is prostate cancer, and do they affect the side effects from radiation therapy?” Dr Zaorsky explained.

The answer to both of these questions was clearly no.

Table. Outcomes and Toxicities, IMRT

Outcomes No Supplement Use Supplement Use sHR
5-year FFBF 9% 8% 0.75
5-year FFDM 3% 2% 0.75
5-year CSS 1% 1% 0.41
5-year OS 9% 5% 0.61
Acute toxicity GU grade 3-4 6% 5% 0.96
GI grade 3-4 1% 0% NA
Freedom from late toxicity GU grade 3-4 1% 1% NA
GI grade 3-4 2% 2% NA
FFBF, freedom from biochemical failure; FFDM, freedom from distal metastases; CSS, cancer-specific survival; OS, overall survival; sHR: adjustment for “healthy male bias”

 

Adding insult to injury, Dr Zaorsky noted that these supplements do not always come cheap.

“For a 1-month supply, some of these supplements cost upwards of $150, so it can range anywhere from $10 a month to well over $100 a month, which is very significant,” he said.

Dr Zaorsky has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 57th Annual Meeting: Abstract 2492. Presented October 20, 2015.

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Famous Men with Prostate Cancer

Marion Barry: He was successfully treated in 1995.

Harry Belafonte: He was diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer in 1996 and successfully treated. He is now a prostate cancer advocate, raising awareness of the disease in men.

Bill Bixby: Diagnosed in 1991. He succumbed to the disease on November 21, 1993.

James Brown: The Godfather of Soul was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2004 but survived. He died of heart failure in 2006.

Robert DeNiro: The Academy Award winner was diagnosed with early-stage cancer in 2003 at the age of 60. He has kept details of his treatment private. His father died of prostate cancer at the age of 71.

Sen. Bob Dole: Diagnosed in 1991 and successfully treated, he became an outspoken prostate cancer advocate. He became a spokesperson for Viagra because of the problems prostate cancer survivors often experience with erectile dysfunction.

Louis Farrakhan: Diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1991. In 1994, he received brachytherapy seed implants. In 2003, he founded the Louis Farrakhan Prostate Cancer Foundation.
Robert Frost: The poet was diagnosed in 1962, had a radical prostatectomy the same year, and died in 1963.

Rudy Giuliani: The former New York City mayor was diagnosed with prostate cancer in April 2000 and had surgery to implant radioactive seeds in September 2000. Giuliani’s father died from prostate cancer in 1981 at the age of 73.

Robert Goulet: Diagnosed in 1993 at the age of 60 after a routine blood test for insurance purposes, Goulet underwent a radical prostatectomy and is now free of prostate cancer. He has remained an outspoken prostate cancer advocate.

Merv Griffin: Diagnosed in 2000 at the age of 75 and underwent 7 weeks of radiation therapy.

Alec Guinness: While battling glaucoma, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in January 2000. In July 2000, he was diagnosed with advanced liver cancer and died a month later on August 5, 2000.

Langston Hughes: Died on May 22, 1967 at the age of 65 after complications from abdominal surgery related to prostate cancer.

John Kerry: The former presidential candidate was diagnosed in late 2002 with early-stage prostate cancer and had successful nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery in 2003. Kerry’s father died of prostate cancer in 2000 at the age of 85.

Timothy Leary: The 1960s counterculture icon died from the disease in 1996 at the age of 75.

Phil Lesh : The Grateful Dead bassist announced that he was diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer in October 2006.

Nelson Mandela: Diagnosed in 2001 with early-stage cancer. He underwent seven weeks of radiotherapy and made a full recovery.

Roger Moore: The former 007 was successfully treated with surgery in 1993.

Pablo Neruda: Died of the disease in 1973 at the age of 69.

Laurence Olivier: Diagnosed in 1967 and underwent radiation treatment that successfully eradicated the cancer.

Jerry Orbach: The Law and Order star died from the disease in Dec. 28, 2004 at the age of 69.

Linus Pauling: The Nobel Prize winner was diagnosed in 1991 at the age of 90 and died of the disease in 1994.

Colin Powell: In 2003, he underwent surgery for early-stage prostate cancer and made a full recovery.

Johnny Ramone: The Ramones guitarist died in 2004 at the age of 55 after a five-year battle with the disease.

Telly Savalas: The “Kojak” star died of the disease in 1994 at the age of 70.

Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf: Diagnosed in 1993 and underwent successful surgery.

Pierre Elliot Trudeau: The Prime Minister of Canada died of prostate cancer in 2000 at the age of 80.

Bishop Desmond Tutu: Diagnosed after a routine exam in 1996. He was treated in the United States with hormone therapy and radiation.

Earl Woods: Tiger Woods’ father was diagnosed in 1998 and successfully treated with radiation, but the cancer returned more aggressively in 2004. Woods died on May 3, 2006 at the age of 74.

Frank Zappa: Died of complications from the disease on December 4, 1993 at the age of 52.

Tommy Chong: Diagnosed in 2012. This comedian had chosen cannabis oil as his treatment.

 

This information is from the Health Diaries.http://www.healthdiaries.com/famous-prostate.htm

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